Recovering from C-Section

Recovering from C-Section

If you have had a C-section, first let me say that you are probably feeling pretty overwhelmed right now. That’s perfectly normal. You have just gone through the drama of delivery and (possibly) an unexpected c-section. You had major surgery, delivered your baby after months of waiting, and your body is now going through major recovery. Your emotions will probably be uncontrollable and your body will feel like a train wreck. Take it one moment at a time and you can do this. Whatever you feel, it’s normal. Here’s what to expect the first few days:

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COMING OUT OF SURGERY
Coming out of surgery, you will feel groggy and nauseated. You may also feel itchy from the meds. You will still have your epidural or spinal block to receive pain medication through.

PAIN MANAGEMENT
You will be given IV pain medication for up to 24 hours. You will probably have a button on your IV that you can push any time you need pain relief. This is not the time to be sparing, the less pain you have, the better you will be able to take care of your baby and recover. After that, your pain management will be in pill-form and you will receive stool softeners and simethicone for gas. These are all safe for your baby if you are breastfeeding. You should be able to breastfeed right away.

BREASTFEEDING
If you decided to breastfeed during your pregnancy, you probably studied up to know what to expect. Breastfeeding after surgery is different and difficult and you will need help. Finding a position that does not aggravate your incision and that your baby will take to, can be frustrating. Don’t give up. Listen to the lactation consultant. They can help.

TAKING CARE OF THE INCISION
The typical incision is 4-6 inches long horizontally below your belly button. You will need to place a pillow over your incision when you cough, sneeze, or laugh. It will be sore and will have staples that will be removed before you leave the hospital.

MOBILITY
The women I have helped weren’t able to move around much at first. Getting out of bed was difficult and they needed help but moving is important to prevent blood clots. By the time you leave the hospital, you will be able to walk to the bathroom with help. Empty your bladder often as a full bladder crowds the healing uterus and slows recovery.

WHAT TO EXPECT RECOVERING AT HOME
You will need help at home so accept any that you can get. You will be given a prescription for painkillers for a week and then you can use over-the-counter meds. You will be recovering from major surgery and taking care of a baby so use this time to rest and take care of yourself.

WHEN TO BE CONCERNED
Call your doctor if your incision oozes or gets worse, painful, or red. If you have a fever, increasing pain, or any other puzzling symptoms, don’t ignore them.

WHAT TO EXPECT LONG-TERM
Expect your recovery to take several weeks to a month. Don’t rush it. Go through the emotional process and deal with the physical limitations and know that you will be back to normal soon. Try to focus on your baby and enjoy this time with your family and take care of yourself; you just did something awesome. Celebrate you!