Dealing with postpartum night sweats

Dealing with postpartum night sweats

There are a lot of crazy things that happen to your body postpartum and most of them, for some reason, no one wants to talk about. They happen to everyone and someone out there should educate women about their own bodies. Postpartum night sweats are a common occurrence for thousands of women. You wake up and suddenly find yourself soaked in sweat for no apparent reason. Why do people not warn you that this could happen to you?

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WHY DOES THIS OCCUR?

Normal night sweating can happen when you are wrapped up too much or your room gets too hot. Postpartum night sweats occur for a different reason and it is a perfectly normal symptom of post-pregnancy. Due to hormone fluctuation (yes, hormones are to blame for yet another postpartum issue) and excess body fluid from lactation, your wonderful body just finds a way to rid itself of what it simply doesn’t need.

You may notice yourself urinating more frequently; though who could tell after spending half of the last nine months in the bathroom anyway. This is also your body’s way of getting rid of all of that extra fluid previously needed to maintain a healthy pregnancy and delivery. Your body will also be producing tons of extra fluid if you are breastfeeding.

If you experience night sweats with other symptoms present, such as fever or chills, call your doctor because these can be signs of a serious infection.

WHAT TO EXPECT

Due to your body’s crazy hormonal ups and downs, these night sweats can occur nightly or sporadically. They will usually last for several weeks after you give birth. They should stop as your body returns to normal.

While there is no treatment, there are some things you can do to help alleviate your symptoms:

  • Keep your room cool.
  • Drink plenty of fluids. With all of that sweating, you can become dehydrated easily.
  • Sleep on a towel and keep a pile of them near to change if you need to.
  • There are great waterproof mattress covers that you just lay under you, too.
  • If your skin gets irritated from all of that moisture, you can consider using powder to ease the chafing and irritation.

WHEN TO BE CONCERNED

One study showed that women who experienced postpartum night sweats and hot flashes were more likely to become depressed. Breastfeeding raises the risk, even more, due to the tremendous hormone fluctuations. If you experience any of these symptoms, talk to someone and tell your doctor. There is help and you don’t need to face it alone.

Don’t worry about the night sweats but if you experience other symptoms such as fever over 100.4 º, foul-smelling vaginal discharge, large clots or bright red bleeding for more than three days after delivery, infected looking stitches, severe cramps, or red, swollen breasts, call your doctor. These can be signs of serious complications.

Also if you feel depressed, or just anxious, talk to someone you trust and keep your six-week checkup and discuss any concerns with your doctor.

Dealing with night sweats may not be pleasant, but you can take heart in knowing that your body is doing exactly what it is supposed to be doing. Isn’t that a wonder!

All you need to know about postpartum uterine cramps

All you need to know about postpartum uterine cramps

With my first child, I was totally unprepared for the afterbirth pains. I went through the pregnancy with all of its ups and downs and then the pain of delivery. I’d heard that postpartum recovery could be trying but I had no idea what to expect.

Soon after the birth, I began having very uncomfortable cramps. They would come and go. They were similar to menstrual cramps but more intense. I just wanted to enjoy my baby. Thankfully, my doctor explained what was going on and what to do about it.

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WHAT’S HAPPENING?

After birth, the uterus begins to shrink back to its normal size by contracting. It is also shifting and moving back to its original pre-pregnancy position. This could feel like cramps and should only last a 10-14 days after birth. These cramps are also known as the afterbirth pains or afterpains.

My afterbirth pains were the worst each time I began breastfeeding. Breastfeeding releases a hormone called oxytocin. This is the hormone responsible for the contractions I breathed (or yelled!) through during delivery. It makes sense that it could cause some pain after the delivery, too.

I tried to think of the cramps as one step in the direction of going back to my pre-pregnancy self.  The cramps were helping my uterus return to its normal size. During pregnancy, the body produced lots of fluids to maintain the life of the baby and now, they were all being flushed out because they were no longer needed.

THINGS TO HELPS EASE THE DISCOMFORT OF POSTPARTUM UTERUS CONTRACTIONS

There were two things that the doctor recommended that helped tremendously. The first was massage. Massaging the uterus gently every half hour or so helps to stimulate it and continue the natural cycle or shrinking back to normal size. Although this can be slightly uncomfortable, it should not be painful. Apply gentle pressure and work in a circular motion.

The other thing was a heating pad or warm cloths. The heat relaxes the muscles between these cramps and just feels good.

There are other things you can try, as well.

  • I always took acetaminophen or ibuprofen postpartum until all of the pain subsided.
  • Empty your bladder often, as a full bladder interrupts these uterus contractions.
  • I know it’s been ages since you were able to lie on your stomach and, for some women, this is the perfect time. Lying on your stomach with a pillow under your lower abdomen can help relieve the discomfort.

WHEN TO BE CONCERNED

These cramps shouldn’t last long and they shouldn’t be unbearable, only uncomfortable. Call your doctor if your pain gets worse or if the cramps last longer than two weeks. These symptoms can be a sign of infection or other postpartum complications.

THE NORMAL HEALING PROCESS

These cramps were mild with my first child but did get less tolerable with consecutive deliveries. Even so, they still weren’t bad. Your body knows how to heal itself and return to normal. Just sit back and watch in wonder of it all as you hold that precious baby that you just brought into the world.

How to deal with swollen hands & feet after birth

How to deal with swollen hands & feet after birth

Towards the end of my pregnancy, I couldn’t wait for my swollen hands and feet to get back to normal. I was longing to wear regular shoes, not to mention my wedding ring. Nothing could prepare me for what would happen to my hands, feet, and face(!) after I had my baby.

I had a really difficult labor, pushing for over 30 hours, and finally having to resort to a forceps delivery. All that time, I was given IV fluids. So when my son finally made an appearance, I had turned into a Shrek with massive sausage fingers, ankle-less feet, and puffy cheeks. Once I had recovered enough to get up on my feet, I could only wobble around in massive slippers. It took over a week for the swelling to go down. I was miserable.

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WHAT CAUSES THIS FLUID RETENTION?

Postpartum edema is a common condition. It affects many women after delivery to various degrees. During pregnancy, the body produces lots of extra fluids and 50% more blood to maintain a healthy pregnancy. This fluid doesn’t just go away immediately after birth. The body has to work for several days to rid itself of it.

That extra dose of hormones that brought my baby into the world was also responsible for some of the fluid retention. During the delivery, the pressure in the uterus forced all the fluid I received via IV to the extremities.

WHAT ARE THE SYMPTOMS OF POSTPARTUM EDMEA?

You may find yourself with extremely swollen hands, feet, legs, and face. Even your stomach can swell. The skin can be tight and itchy. There is a simple test you can do to check for fluid retention. Press on your skin for a few seconds and then after you remove your finger, there should not be an indention. The longer the indention lasts, the worse your condition is.

WHAT ARE MY TREATMENT OPTIONS?

Your body will naturally rid itself of these extra fluids. Even in my extreme case, it went away on its own. You may notice that you sweat a lot or urinate often. These are just other ways your body is getting rid of fluids.

I found a few things that made the swelling feel better:

  • Keeping my hands and feet elevated.
  • Avoid crossing my legs.
  • Drinking a lot of fluids to keep things moving and avoiding salty foods.
  • Getting up and moving around to get my circulation moving properly again. This can be difficult after a c-section and you should go slowly.
  • Soaking my feet in warm water with a few drops of essential oils.
  • Massage can improve circulation and help against fluid retention. I scheduled a massage right after we got back from the hospital and my husband watched the baby. It was magical!

WHEN TO BE CONCERNED

Be watchful that your condition improves daily. If you have any other symptoms like chest pain, trouble breathing, pain in your legs, headaches, changes in vision, or nausea, or if your condition worsens, call your doctor as these can be signs of other complications.

Hair loss after birth – the untold secret of motherhood

Hair loss after birth – the untold secret of motherhood

Like all other moms, I counted down the days until my son was born. Not just because I was excited to meet my little guy, but I could finally look forward to feeling normal again and kiss the aches and pains of pregnancy goodbye. Little did I know that the consequences of having the surplus of hormones during pregnancy suddenly disappear after birth would only bring on a new set of problems.

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HAIR LOSS AFTER BIRTH

It started out with my husband complaining that my hair was clogging up the shower drain more often. I put this down as me losing my summer curls, not having much time to worry about how enjoyable his showers were while I was on the bed fighting with my new-born to breastfeed. Eventually it got to the point where I was sweeping up mounds of hair from my bedroom floor after brushing or drying my hair every morning. This is when I started panicking. So, I did what any normal person would do and called on Doctor Google. I know this is usually terrible advice and leaves one convinced they have some form of rare and dreaded disease, but for once it actually left me hopeful.

I found many, many other moms out there who were all going through the same thing – they all started losing copious amounts of hair in the first few months after giving birth. What it boils down to is pretty simple: hormones.

CAUSES OF HAIR LOSS AFTER PREGNANCY

Outside of pregnancy, our hair grows at different rates. 85-95 percent of your hair will be growing while the left over 5-15 percent is in resting stage. Your hair falls out during resting stage. During pregnancy the growing stage of our hair is extended due to an increase in estrogen, which is why we experience minimal hair loss and have thick and fabulous locks. Once our baby is born and this extra dose of estrogen disappears, our rate of growth goes back to normal and we are left with a lot more hair in the resting stage – hence the increased hair loss.

HOW TO PREVENT HAIR LOSS AFTER BIRTH

There really isn’t anything you can do to prevent this. Some moms say that taking extra vitamins helped them, while others get fed up and chop off their hair for a new ‘mom-cut’. As frustrating as this might be, it is only temporary. Your hair should return back to normal by your baby’s first birthday.

I carried on with my postnatal vitamins and went for regular haircuts and pretty much just waited it out (and promised to not clog up the shower drain each day). Keeping up with vitamins B, C, E and Zinc can only do your body good and some moms say this actually helped reduce the hair loss.

DEALING WITH POST PREGNANCY HAIR LOSS

It can be really stressful having to deal with something like this while you are getting used to motherhood, but remember you are not alone. Look to other moms for guidance and support when you feel a little hopeless and remember your body will always bounce back – it just takes a little bit of time.